Paddling the Paint river of Michigan's Upper Peninsula...and a little bit of the Net too

Evan and I realized we both had the weekend free about 3 days before this paddle, and didn't know for sure if we were going to have some adventures until about 12 hours before I left Eau Claire to meet him in the North. Our plan was to figure out a river or rivers to paddle Friday night while hammocking around the campfire, and that is what we did.

We settled on a 13 mile paddle that started on the Net river for the first 2.5 miles, and finished the remaining 10 on the Paint. Immediately and for the entire day the scenery was U.P. goodness. Large spruces and pines mixed in with birches and maples, all lining a rocky shoreline bordering slow waters. The Net river, from what I paddled and aerial photos above our put-in, seems to be large open lake-like sections divided by short wavy pinch points with very small rapids, maybe class I on a good day. There are a few very small rapids upstream on the Net, but American Whitewater reports suggest nothing more than waves. We did have a few logs/beaver dams that spanned the stream but had enough water over them that we could scoot across, use your best judgement here.

Once we hit the Paint we eventually found some rapids. The first was pretty short and a fun little warmup, then a bit longer one, and finally we arrived at the Upper Hemock rapids. This was a fun one that has the most rad campsite right on the rapids, river left, with what looks to be a huge eddy to pull into. We saw some canoers who were portaging the rapid while we passed through. It starts with an S curve at the top, where the portage and campsite are. After the bending it was a matter of finding the line with enough water. Plenty of stuff to avoid, and occasionally a ledge that spanned a good chunk of the river. Nonetheless it was pretty small and not bad, and I'd say we were on the lower side of navigable. A little more water here would make it more flexible and peppy, while a lot more water would make it straight up party time in there. I'll pray for lots of rain before the next trip so we can camp on the rowdy and then run some laps, huzzah! 

Our group recouped in the eddy below the rapids, and I managed to get a pic of Evan running the last bit of em.

After a short distance we started to notice the river slowing down, like it does above dams or large rapids, and sure enough we came to a horizon line. Hello Lower Hemlock Rapids! This was the highlight of the day and everyone crushed it, including Abbie who was paddling her Necky Looksha LV for the first time. I think her success sealed the deal on her relationship with the boat. I gotta say this rapid was larger than I expected, and that's a good thing. It was a blast and had plenty of waves to enjoy. Many hoots and hollers all around. From here it was a few flat, moving-water miles until our takeout at the Bates-Amasa bridge landing. Plenty of space, but otherwise just a dirt landing. Who needs more?

Between the Upper and Lower Hemlock rapids were some really cool little tributary streams. They are pretty tough to find but if you take a minute or so and listen quietly you can sometimes hear them. One 100 yard section had 3 little creeks and super steep hills bordering the main river, it was absolutely awesome northwoods scenery.